Cantueso Periana SL,

29710 Periana (Málaga), Andalucía, Spain

Our Team of 2019

Posted on July 1, 2019
The team

At Cantueso we are very proud of our team who work so hard in serving the public both in the restaurant and cottages and we would like to introduce them to you.

L to R: Antonio, Ana, Eva, Cipri, Lucia, Nicky

Antonio (front of house) is well known to our visitors as he has spent several summers with us. Antonio is a mine of information about the area, spanish food, and wines, so his knowledge is put to good use helping our many overseas visitors. Other times he has his own bar in the village.

Ana (front of house) - is here for her third year with us, running things out front with Antonio. Her winning smile and efficiency makes her very popular with guests. In real life she is a music graduate waiting for a teaching job in schools.

Eva (head chef) - for several years Eva has worked at Cantueso as sous chef and this year stepped up to the head chef role. She is very passionate about using fresh local ingredients and that all dishes must be "home" cooked. Nothing is bought in, and she has introduced lots of new dishes to the menu.

Cipriano is a student assisting Eva in the kitchen for the summer. Cipri is studying at the Malaga cookery school and brightens up the kitchen with his colourful dress sense, and is keen to use his training in a practical situation.

Lucía (head of housekeeping) - was already here when we took over in 2007. She has been invaluable during our many refurbishments, and makes sure that all ten cottages and the apartment are always properly prepared for guests.

Nicky (the boss) say no more!

All the team are Periana locals and work hard to maintain our number one spot in the area. They look forward to meeting you.

Posted in - Cantueso Cottages - Food & Drink - Periana - Restaurante Cantueso

XII Peaches Day Festival

Posted on July 5, 2014

On Saturday 2nd August 2014 the 12th Peaches Festival will once again be held in Periana. Unlike last year when due to economic restrictions it was held alongside the August festival, it will once again be a stand alone event.

During the day there will be the usual stalls and amusements set up along the main street with various free tastings, and a medieval market. There will also be the popular cookery competition; dishes for which should of course contain Peaches.

Later there will be an on stage Festival of Rock & Roll, with various tribute acts and then music with Dj’s until the early hours.

In previous years more than 5000 people came to the village and this year is bound to be just as lively. A stroll around the streets filled with the scent of peaches is bound to get your taste buds moving and suitable food and refreshment stalls will be available.

A little Peach History: It is thought that a resident brought the first seedling to Periana after a visit to Argentina 200 years ago and it thrived in the wonderful climate and fertile land. As the crop developed it was taken to neighbouring villages on the backs of donkeys and eventually became popular with buyers from Murcia and surrounding provinces. However it was not until the last half of the 20th century that the crop came to prominence being appreciated for its taste, aromatic scent, soft velvet skin, colour and culinary versatility and by the 70’s a good year would yield as much as 4 million kilos.

Sadly as so often happens in agriculture, the crops were affected by pests and several years of drought which led to a steady decline in production. This continued until about ten years ago when market demand encouraged growers to plant more trees and the municipality started to promote peaches once again. Hence this year is the twelth in which the village and visitors will get to party the night away.

If you have time come up and visit us at Restaurante Cantueso where Carmen our chef is sure to produce some very tempting dishes, and whatever you do, don’t forget to buy a box of these special fruits to take home before you leave.

¡Que aproveche!

Posted in - Food & Drink - Periana - Restaurante Cantueso - Things to Do - Travel

I’m Smarter than the Average Bear!

Posted on March 3, 2013

Yogi certainly was and it seems that either he or one of his family of admirers came to Cantueso earlier today.

Yogi’s table had the new “Para Picar” menu and were so pleased that they decided to leave this unusual thank you card in the kids playroom. (Well where else?)

We are pleased that the new menu ideas are receiving nice comments and we hope lot’s more of you will come and try them ?

Posted in - Food & Drink - Periana - Restaurante Cantueso

Saffron the New Spanish Gold

Posted on January 6, 2013
It takes 250,000 of these flowers to make 1 kilo of saffron

Lovers of Paella will know that you need that most important spice, saffron, to give it the distinctive deep yellow colour and most critically the taste to die for.  However what is less well known is that despite Spain being one of the largest growers of the saffron crocus from which it comes, they cannot keep up with demand.

In La Mancha where it was first introduced by the Moors, whole families have for centuries grown, harvested and sold this sought after spice.  As with olive growing it is a family business that involves dedication and tradition not to mention patience.  Imagine how long it must take to strip the stigmas from the crocus flower with it needing 250,000 flowers to yield 1 kilo of threads.  At this point it is worth 3000€ per kilo.

In La Mancha they can only produce 1500 kilos per year and yet exports from Spain are about 190,000 kilos.  An amazing mismatch that can only be explained by the import of Iranian, Moroccan and Greek produce.  The growers of La Mancha are quick to point out that the largest exporters are the regions of Valencia and Murcia where saffron is not even grown.  Often these inferior products contain more than just the stigma and tests have even found a completely different spice such as cardamom being present.  It is claimed that lower quality foreign imports make up the difference with adulterated product being commonly sold as Spanish (apparently it is within the EU laws to label it as such).

Cooks who want the best should look for saffron with the official “Genuine La Mancha Saffron” label.

At Restaurante Cantueso we only cook Paella to order after 24 hours notice as it cannot be prepared in advance without losing lots of delicate flavours.  In a previous blog post we detailed the great influence that the Moors have had on Spanish culture, architecture, agriculture and of course cuisine. See “Sugar the lost crop in Periana”

Posted in - Cantueso Cottages - Food & Drink - Periana - Travel

Museum of Honey in Colmenar

Posted on July 4, 2012
Calle Posito, the home of Malaga Museum of Honey

Do you suffer from: respiratory problems, asthma, high blood pressure, anaemia, fatigue, rheumatism, liver disease or even intellectual exhaustion?  Well if you do, there is help available through the magical properties of honey.  It is claimed that different types of honey have a variety of medicinal properties and the main types in Málaga include: Orange blossom, Lavender, Rosemary, Eucalyptus, Chestnut and even Avocado.  And whilst we offer no guarantees regarding the efficacy of these claims ): we do recommend this as a day out from Cantueso, especially if you have children.

Very educational and informative displays

The recently opened museum is a little off the beaten track, tucked away in a back street of Colmenar, but well worth the effort to see and learn about honey.  A good starting point is the 15 minute film in several languages which introduces the visitor to the beekeeper’s world, charting its history going back 8000 years, and describing the complex work of the bee.  You can then wander around the museum which has lots of interactive displays, exhibits and finally a shop which sells honey, beeswax, soap and other associated products.

Giant bee at work

 

The museum has been set up by the Beekeeper’s Association of Málaga who proudly display the eight types of honey which have been awarded their “Seal of Quality.”

Einstein it seems noted the importance of bees and is quoted at the museum as having said:

“If the bee disappears from the surface of the earth, man would have no more than four years to live.”

It is a good thought provoking quote even though it seems he never said it!!!

Opening hours

Tuesday – Friday:   10am – 2pm and 3pm – 6pm. Monday: closed

Saturday and Sunday: 10am – 2pm Guided visits: by appointment

Colmenar is about 8 miles from Cantueso in Periana and 13 miles from Málaga.

Entry 2€ or Guided visit: 6€ Gift pack included with the visit

Website: http://www.museodelamiel.com/

Posted in - Cantueso Cottages - Food & Drink - Periana - Things to Do - Travel

Smell the Fruit on Peach Day in Periana

Posted on July 1, 2011

IX Día del Melecotón, Periana, Spain Saturday 30th July 2011

Another special day is coming up in Periana with lots of festivities as the village comes out in force to celebrate this special crop for which the village is justifiably famous. The day will see competitions and entertainments all day in the main streets and continues well into the night.

The most important competition is the Concurso Gastronómico when anyone can enter a special dish in which the main ingredient is Peaches. It is always strongly contested and there are three prizes of 100€, 200€ and 300€.

Last year more than 5000 people came to the village and this year is bound to be just as lively. A stroll around the streets filled with the scent of peaches is bound to get your taste buds moving and suitable food and refreshment stalls will be available.

A little Peach History: It is thought that a resident brought the first seedling to Periana after a visit to Argentina 200 years ago and it thrived in the wonderful climate and fertile land. As the crop developed it was taken to neighbouring villages on the backs of donkeys and eventually became popular with buyers from Murcia and surrounding provinces. However it was not until the last half of the 20th century that the crop came to prominence being appreciated for its taste, aromatic scent, soft velvet skin, colour and culinary versatility and by the 70’s a good year would yield as much as 4 million kilos.

Sadly as so often happens in agriculture, the crops were affected by pests and several years of drought which led to a steady decline in production. This continued until about ten years ago when market demand encouraged growers to plant more trees and the municipality started to promote peaches once again. Hence this year is the ninth in which the village and visitors will get to party the night away.

If you have time come up and visit us at Restaurante Cantueso where Carmen our chef is sure to produce some very tempting dishes, and whatever you do, don’t forget to buy a box of these special fruits to take home before you leave.

¡Que aproveche!

Posted in - Food & Drink - Periana - Restaurante Cantueso

Another Sherry Aunty?

Posted on June 3, 2011

Summer Menu and Drinks at Restaurante Cantueso.

We have just introduced our summer à la carte menu and will again also be offering some special seasonal drinks in addition to our usual wine list.

Carmen our chef has created a new summer menu combining some old favourites with new seasonal dishes and intends to offer a daily special starter, main course, and dessert. She has also revised our popular six-course tasting menu.

And of course it wouldn't be summer without a few special drinks. Pimm's of course, and now that Sherry is a trendy drink again, we will try to tempt you with the likes of Rebujito a cocktail of chilled dry sherry mixed with soda or Seven-up: an ideal thirst quencher for the weary traveller and typically popular at Spanish ferias.

Sherry known in Spain as Jerez, has of course been popular in Britain for centuries and in the main it was British families such as Sandeman, Osborne and Byass that in the 18th century cornered the market producing a high octane wine (typically 15-20%) which is fortified with brandy. It can only legally be described as sherry if it is produced in the “sherry triangle” of southern Andalucía.

In the past sherry has been known as a drink for weddings or funerals and of course Christmas wouldn't be the same if aunty didn't have a glass or two of Bristol Cream, but now there has been a strong revival with wine lovers discovering the likes of manzanillas, finos, palo cortados, amontillados, and olorosos. A different taste for every occasion and every meal. Maybe in the past you have tried Pedro Ximenez poured over ice cream, or a crisp well-chilled fino with olives or tapas. Fino and manzanilla are perfect accompaniments to Spanish food and soups of many styles. The two can be used interchangeably in cooking and are well suited to steaming mussels and other shellfish, or as an ingredient in soups.

No matter whether you enjoy sherry in food or by the glass there are many varieties to delight your palate and we hope to see you soon relaxing in Periana with a glass of fino or maybe two :)

Footnote:

The Pimm's we, and most bars use, is Pimm's No 1 Cup, and those of us with good memories may remember seeing other numbers in years gone by.

There were six Pimm's products, all of which are fruit cups but only Cups No 1, 3 and 6 are still available at present. The essential difference among them is the base alcohol used to produce them:

Pimm's No. 1 Cup is based on gin and can be served both on ice or in cocktails.

Pimm's No. 2 Cup was based on Scotch Whisky. Currently phased out.

Pimm's No. 3 Cup is based on brandy. Phased out, but a version infused with spices and orange peel marketed as Pimm's Winter Cup is now seasonally available.

Pimm's No. 4 Cup was based on rum. Currently phased out.

Pimm's No. 5 Cup was based on rye whisky. Currently phased out.

Pimm's No. 6 Cup is based on vodka. It is still produced, but in small quantities.

 

Posted in - Food & Drink - Periana - Restaurante Cantueso - Travel

Lake Viñuela the Spectacular View from Cantueso

Posted on February 4, 2011

From almost any part of Periana and the surrounding hills you look down on the spectacular scene of Lake Viñuela a man-made reservoir containing 170 million cubic meters of water and covering 700 hectares of land.  Obviously the content varies with rainfall and since the very low levels of 2009 the reservoir has built up much better reserves.  An interesting graph of current and past levels can be seen here.

Lake Vinuela seen from the Restaurant Terrace at Cantueso in Periana

The reservoir was originally muted in the 19th century but only became a viable scheme in the 1980's and was achieved by damming the River Guaro.  This river and its many tributaries fill the reservoir and it provides potable water and irrigation for many hectares of arable land around the lake.  Fortunately before the flooding of the valley, excavations of various Neolithic and old Roman sites were undertaken and many of the artefacts found can be seen in Málaga museum.

The lake takes its name from the nearby village of La Viñuela which overlooks the valley.  It was originally a sleepy hamlet on one of the many routes up from the coast heading towards Granada, and provided a watering stop for the thirsty muleteers.  The old bar is still open and nowadays serves local workers and tourists.

A very pleasant trip can be made driving around the lake, noting as you go the eagles that soar above the lake and the many small birds along the shore.  There are many interesting detours and refreshment stops to be made at the villages en route.  These include: Canillas de Aceituno, Alcaucin, Periana, Riogordo, Comares, and Benamorgosa.  At the Southern end of the lake there is a very attractive picnic spot with tables and barbecues for public use.  A similar picnic area is also to be found below Periana where the River Guaro enters the lake.

The lake is well stocked with fish (Carp, Trout and Bass) and sailing is allowed but only with non-motorised craft.  Fishing licences are required and need to be obtained in Málaga with lots of bureaucratic hoops to jump through and not really practical for short visits.  Some people say you need to take an examination before being granted a licence but the Costa del Sol tourist office says otherwise.

The department for more information is:

Provincial Delegation of Agriculture and Fishing in Málaga.

Avenida Aurora, 47

29002 Málaga

Tlf: +34 951 038 200

Email: dpmalaga.ctcd@juntadeandalucia.es

www.juntadeandalucia.es

The following site gives more details on fishing in the lake but you are advised to check the latest situation with the office above.

For further information regarding the villages that surround Cantueso please see the “Things to do” section of our website.  You can also check the current view on the live webcam at Restaurante Cantueso.

 

Posted in - Cantueso Cottages - Food & Drink - Periana - Restaurante Cantueso - Things to Do - Travel

What has Periana got to do with Ice Cream?

Posted on November 5, 2010

Now is the time to harvest Algarrobo beans in Periana and men can be seen in the olive groves beating the beans with long poles so that they fall onto nets spread under the trees.

The Tree with Three Names: The Algarrobo trees (also known as Carob or Locust trees) typically grow amongst the olives and produce a long brown pod which has traditionally been used to make chocolate substitute and for animal feed. However in recent years it has become a valuable crop because it can be turned into E410, Carob Gum, also known as Locust Bean Gum which is used as the ingredient that makes soft scoop ice cream, soft.

Carob/Algarrobo Beans

When in the bible it said that St John was in the desert and ate locusts, fortunately he was not eating the grasshopper variety but the sweet tasting Carob pods.

Closer to home we can roast the pods then grind them into a powder using a food processor or coffee grinder and then use in cooking anywhere where chocolate powder is called for. And if you are really desperate you can also chew them just as children did in the UK during the war when starved of real sweets.

Carob also has therapeutic uses. It is known to halt serious cases of diarrhea in adults, infants, and animals. Use 1 tablespoon of carob power in a cup of liquid, or make a paste of carob powder and water. It is also known to help with nausea, vomiting, and upset stomachs. One French physician even claims to have successfully reversed kidney failure with Carob.

Carob Beans before ripening

Carob is a chocolate lovers delight as it is not only delicious, but low in fat and calories, caffeine-free, and lacks the health risks of chocolate. So next time you wander around Periana and see those large evergreen trees with large brown pods why not try one, or if you prefer buy some powder at a health food store it will help you, and our local farmers. As yet at Restaurante Cantueso we have not added it to our menu but you never know.

Posted in - Cantueso Cottages - Food & Drink - Periana - Travel

Driving over Pomegranates in Periana

Posted on October 1, 2010

No this is not a sequel to the best selling book by Chris Stewart, Driving over Lemons but our way of drawing attention to the odd times we live in.

The Fruit Hand Grenade

Around us at Cantueso this autumn we have the sight of grapes withering on the vine, figs rotting on the floor underneath the trees and yes pomegranates on the side of the road.  Food for free but nobody seems bothered.  Just look too at the Spanish supermarkets that sell Israeli oranges and imported lemons from the Americas and yet they grow well here.  Yes, we know that fruit is not always in season, but with the all year round varieties of lemon grown in Spain, there can be no excuse. It is even more strange to find that buying blueberries in Spain is difficult but if you buy them in the UK, the country of origin on the pack is Spain.  Maybe it is our fault as consumers and we really should only buy things in season.


The fruit Hand Grenade

A Pomegranate is of course called Granada in Spanish and the city that takes its name from the fruit also has it as part of the city's coat of arms.  In Spanish it is also the word for a grenade, and when you see the ripe fruit bursting open, packed with hundreds of tiny red seeds it is easy to see why.

In the lanes and byways around Cantueso here in Periana there are many bushes growing wild and at this time of year spilling their fruit onto the roadside. Take a walk and enjoy.

In recent years much has been written about the health giving properties of the fruit, no doubt in part, promoted by the fruit juice manufacturers but there seems to be a consensus that it really is one of the “super fruits.”

Some of the claims:

One pomegranate contains tons of nutrition… and best of all, it’s low in calories.  In just one pomegranate fruit there is around 100 calories and only about 25g of sugar. But that’s only the beginning of the nutrition pomegranate provides:a great source of potassium

more antioxidants compared to other juices and even wine!

vitamin B and Vitamin C

great source of fibre

helps prevent heart disease

keeps your immune system in top notch conditions

prevents build-up of material in your arteries

There are many drinks and even foods that are made with the pomegranate and it is now becoming more commercialized and can be found in supermarkets in a variety of forms.  The most popular is pomegranate juice but there are also pomegranate jellies, pomegranate wine, and even pomegranate salad dressing.

Unfortunately the commercial growth of Pomegranates has been largely left to America (after the Spanish introduced it) and Africa.  However for those of us that live around Periana it is easy to grow as the climate is ideal, and you could expect a crop after about four years.  If you are a visitor or can't wait, just be nice to your neighbours!

Posted in - Cantueso Cottages - Food & Drink - Periana - Restaurante Cantueso - Travel

Tapas Tour of Malaga

Posted on September 2, 2010

If you fancy a great day out in Malaga why not try our tapas tour?  We know that many of you enjoy tapas at Restaurante Cantueso and thought that when staying in Periana you might like to visit some great and quaint bars in Malaga that serve equally delicious tapas.  Some of the bars boast a menu of over one hundred different tapas.  We have sampled a few bars and there are many more to be explored.  Beware however of the bars with menu boards outside in many languages.  They tend to be tourist traps.

The first thing you must do is appoint a non-drinking driver or get a taxi, as it can be a little alcoholic.  Tapas tasting is thirsty work.

We recommend that you start about midday and expect to take three or four hours.

The starting point is in the Alameda Principal opposite the train station.  There is El Corte Ingles the large store on this side of the road and plenty of nearby parking.
Start to walk up the Alameda Principal (turn left with your back to the store) and cross the bridge and as you pass the flower stalls in the centre of the road look out for no 18 which is the oldest bar in Malaga called, La Antigua Casa de Guardia. Stop for a drink and notice they chalk your bill on the counter in front of you, and make sure you don’t move along when it is time to pay or you may get your neighbours.  They specialise in sweet Malaga wines but other drinks are available.  They also serve shellfish but save yourself for later, as it gets better.

Continue to walk up Alameda and you will come to a pedestrianised street called Marques de Larios.  This is the start of the tour.  Up the street after a few yards on the left is a smaller street called Calle Marin Garcia.  In front of you is Lo Gueno a very small bar.  Get a drink and a tapas or two.  Cheese and ham are their specialities.
Next continue up Larios and almost at the top, on the right, is a small street called Calle Moreno Monroy.  Towards the end is my favourite bar called Orellano. Here you order a drink and you will get the first small tapas free.  You will see many others on display and you should order one, two or even three more with maybe a glass of wine or two.  You don’t pay until you leave but no need to panic, as it is not expensive.  One tapas to try is Tortillitas de Camerones (shrimp tortillas).  Often this is so popular that you have to stand outside.

Now you are getting the hang of it move to our next favourite.  See street plan if you have one or ask for Molina Larios.  The bar is called La Rabana.  It is a newish building with tables inside made from old barrels, or sit outside if warm enough.  Their tapas is good and they also have a bar menu with Camembert cheese or ham croquettes and Serrano ham platters.  There is also an excellent restaurant up stairs if you are really hungry.  The house wine is very good as are the loos!

After this stop and if you are still hungry or thirsty find some more bars of your own, but if coffee and cakes are fancied we have a final stop.

Go back to Marques de Larios and there is a lovely coffee shop called Lepanto about half way up on the right. Muchos calories.

Enjoy! and let us know how you get on.

You will find a street plan here.

 

Posted in - Cantueso Cottages - Food & Drink - Periana - Travel